How to Build a Balanced Investment Portfolio

Investors use a portfolio to group their financial assets. Portfolios typically contain a mixture of stocks, shares, bonds, commodities, currencies, art, and real estate, etc. Maintaining a balanced portfolio is critical. If you put all of your eggs in one basket, it could be a disaster. For example, investing 95% of your money in cryptocurrencies might seem like a smart idea when the price of Bitcoin is rising, but when it loses 60% of its value overnight, you’ll lose everything.

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You can opt to manage your portfolio yourself, but in most cases, it is better to pay for Minneapolis investment portfolio management, such as this service from the Berger Financial Group. However, it is always better to have a good understanding of how portfolio management works, so in this article, we are going to discuss how best to build a balanced portfolio.

Decide How Much Risk You Can Tolerate

Your tolerance to risk is something that might change over time, but some people are always more risk-averse than others.

Choose Appropriate Assets

There are many different types of asset classes. It is important that you select the right ones according to your goals and tolerance to risk. A balanced portfolio includes a varied selection of high and low-risk assets, according to the investor’s tolerance to risk. Think about your needs, whether you can afford to tie your money up in long-term investments, or whether you are looking for quick returns.

Attach Weight to Different Assets

Some assets are high-risk and others low-risk. Some offer quick returns whereas others are long-term investments that might not realize a decent return for several years – real estate being a good example of this type of asset class.

A conservative investor would typically place greater weight on fixed income securities such as government treasury bonds. These won’t make you rich, but they are safe and offer a decent return. A moderate portfolio would include a higher proportion of equities, which offer better returns but are more volatile. An aggressive portfolio investor would look at investing in high-risk assets such as ETFs and emerging markets.

Decide how much weight you want to attach to each asset, based on your tolerance to risk and long-term goals.

Strategic Rebalancing

We have already covered risk tolerance, but it is worth pointing out that your portfolio should be strategically rebalanced according to your current lifestyle and goals. For example, a single person in his early 30s can afford to take a more aggressive approach to investment planning than someone less than five years away from retirement.

Rebalance your portfolio in line with important life events, such as getting married or having a family. Pay close attention to tax implications too. An advisor can tell you if selling off some parts of your portfolio will land you with a tax bill while investing in a new asset class could save you money.

Remember to keep your portfolio diversified, even within each asset class. The more you diversify, the more you spread the risk.

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